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theflowerandwillowworldofkyoto:

Geisha in Winter Costume 1890s by Blue Ruin1 on Flickr.
Via Flickr: A Geisha wearing a thick winter kimono and an Okoso-zukin headscarf. This photograph appears in the book entitled “Illustrations of Japanese Life” published in 1896, descriptions by S. Takashima and photographs by K. Ogawa, the preface to Volume One acknowledges additional photographic plates by Messrs. Tamamura, S. Kajima and Prof. Burton. Text as follows: “A Walk on a Snowy Day – The snow fall is very heavy in the northern provinces, but very light in Tokyo. The silvery scene is much appreciated here so that the first snow fall invariably tempts many Tokyo people to hire a skiff and sail on the Sumida River to enjoy nature in her silvery robe. In wintery days the Japanese woman wears a head-gear made of a long piece generally of crape, which covers the head as well as part of the face. Although the shawl is the latest innovation to her of late it has become quite prevalent.”

theflowerandwillowworldofkyoto:

Geisha in Winter Costume 1890s by Blue Ruin1 on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
A Geisha wearing a thick winter kimono and an Okoso-zukin headscarf.

This photograph appears in the book entitled “Illustrations of Japanese Life” published in 1896, descriptions by S. Takashima and photographs by K. Ogawa, the preface to Volume One acknowledges additional photographic plates by Messrs. Tamamura, S. Kajima and Prof. Burton. Text as follows:

“A Walk on a Snowy Day – The snow fall is very heavy in the northern provinces, but very light in Tokyo. The silvery scene is much appreciated here so that the first snow fall invariably tempts many Tokyo people to hire a skiff and sail on the Sumida River to enjoy nature in her silvery robe. In wintery days the Japanese woman wears a head-gear made of a long piece generally of crape, which covers the head as well as part of the face. Although the shawl is the latest innovation to her of late it has become quite prevalent.”

allyoubleedislove:

Donkey Skin, 1970.

allyoubleedislove:

Donkey Skin, 1970.

kittyinva:


1914 Mary Pickford in “Such a Little Queen”.

kittyinva:

1914 Mary Pickford in “Such a Little Queen”.

wasbella102:

Andrew Gifford Green Park, Blue Haze

wasbella102:

Andrew Gifford Green Park, Blue Haze

grett:

untitled by ju∞ on Flickr.

grett:

untitled by ju∞ on Flickr.

dreamingofcossackia:

Ukrainian Kuban Cossacks on the march during the Great War. At this time they would have still been in service to the Tsar, prior to both Ukraine and Cossackia declaring independence.

dreamingofcossackia:

Ukrainian Kuban Cossacks on the march during the Great War. At this time they would have still been in service to the Tsar, prior to both Ukraine and Cossackia declaring independence.

fishstickmonkey:

Zdenek Burian

fishstickmonkey:

ladycashasatiger:

allstarsandconstellations:

The Shield of Achilles
From Royal Collection © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, 1821.

The silver-gilt convex shield has a central medallion cast in high relief with Apollo in a quadriga, surrounded by stars and female figures representing the constellations. The broad border is cast in low relief with scenes of human life (a wedding and banquet, siege, ambush and engagement, harvest, judicial appeal, vintage, oxherds defending their beasts and a Cretan dance), within an outer border of stylised waves and a broad reeded rim.

The shield is a ‘reconstruction’ of the mythological shield made for Achilles by the lame god Hephaestus and brought down to Earth by Thetis (mother of Achilles), together with other specially forged armor. The shield was said to have been a mirror of the world of gods and men, within the ‘mighty Stream of Ocean’ and although Homer described its appearance in great detail, the precise relationship of the various elements was unclear.

The final design of the shield was completed in 1817, by John Flaxman, and delivered to the king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and king of Hanover, George IV.

The Waterloo Shield presented to Wellington by some bigwigs in the City in 1822 was commissioned in 1814 (and also modelled on the Achilles Shield), so maybe Prinny was slightly envious inspired and wanted one too?